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The Genesis of Gnostic Theology

The Genesis of Gnostic Theology

Adam_Seth_GnosisIn a Hermetic text, it reads that the Gnosis of the Mind as a state of consciousness is a “vision of divine things”. G. R. S. Mead adds that “Gnosis is knowledge about something, but communion, through the knowledge of God.” This is its ultimate goal, the “knowing” of “God”, the Reality in us.

It is not the belief, the faith or the simple knowledge that matters.  The key is the internal communion of Mind that rewires the individual within the Universal Mind. It upgrades the basic constructs of the Human Being, increasing the man’s ability to “transcend the limits of duality that makes him become self-realized man with the understanding of the divine consciousness.”

Gnosis about who we were and what we have become, where we were and where we came from stop, where we are headed and where we are redeemed, which is generating, and what is regeneration. ~Excerpts of Theodotus

The possession of Gnosis means the ability to receive and understand the Revelation. The true Gnostic individual is the one who knows both the inner revelation and the outer revelation, which is veiled, and the connection between them.

The true Gnostic is not someone who found out the truth about himself through his own helpless reflection, but someone for whom the manifestations of the inner worlds are shown and become intelligible.

The beginning of the Path of Perfection is the Gnosis of Man, but the Gnosis of God is Perfection already perfected. “Improvement” is a technical term for development in Gnosis, Gnostic being made known as the “perfect”.

The entry onto the Path of Gnosis is called “the pathway back home”. As we have seen, it is a return, a turn away from the world, a “repentance” of all kinds.  It is a practice of being in the world but not being of this world.

 


[1] Syncretism is the combining of different (often seemingly contradictory) beliefs, often while melding practices of various schools of thought. Syncretism may involve the merger and analogizing of several originally discrete traditions, especially in the theology and mythology of religion, thus asserting an underlying unity and allowing for an inclusive approach to other faiths.

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